fisherman

4 p.m. Bayside Kick in the Proverbial Ass

Sunday, January 8th, 2012

I have been a bit in a deep funk.  It is hard to describe it other than that producing work, and thinking clearly.  It took talking to my childhood friend Jerry Kolber to snap me out of the funk, and to start the process of lifting that brain cloud that settled over my spirit.  We do need people around us to tell us like it is.  Sometimes they will tell us what we don’t want to hear, but things we need to hear.  That is what Jerry did for me.  He gave me the proverbial “kick in the ass.”

My mindset this morning was so different than the last couple of weeks.  I was clearer in thought.  I had some guidance in what I wanted to accomplish today.  I sat down and wrote up some questions for an upcoming Lucid Thoughts post.  Did some emails, caught up on some tasks that needed doing.

I knew that I needed to get outside and do some photography.  Darkness comes so early these days, so I knew I wanted to head out to the bay at the time the sun would start to dip towards the horizon.  I live only minutes away from Tokyo Bay.  In fact I am in walking/biking distance from Kasai Rinkai Bayside Park.

Ever since growing up in Miami, I have always lived near the water.  The water is calming for me.  Therefore, today I walked down to the edge of Tokyo, and could look off out into the bay.  I could see all the way to Tateyama in Chiba. I watched the airplanes far off in the distance taking off from Haneda.  I also watched the sun hit the fishing boats as they headed back to Urayasu.  Some of the boats even carry the same name as my wife’s family, Yoshino, no connection but shows my family’s long time roots in this area.

It was quiet.  I was there just watching the sun go down, listening to the waves, hit the rocks.  Peeping the lonely fisherman casting their lines out into the waters.  It had been so long since I had gone out into my own neighborhood, sat down on the rocks and just soaked the ambience in.

Hopefully, this is the beginning of the cleaning out of my mental funk.  I pray that things keep progressing from here, and that I may be able to help myself, and help others in the process.  We all need that proverbial kick in the ass.  Mine happened at 4 o’clock in the p.m. at the edge of Tokyo Bay.

4 p.m. Kasai Rinkai Park, Tokyo Bay, Sunset

Bridge to My Dreams, Tokyo Version

Sunday with Palms, and Stones, Tokyo Bay

Sun Sets, the Moon Rises

A Japanese Rock Garden Saved from the Bulldozer

Friday, December 30th, 2011

The other day I made my way from the Tokyo side of the Kyoedogawa RIver to the Urayasu side to just wander around in the clear winter air.  I love wandering around the old part of the fisherman town of Urayasu.  The tight alleys and the corrugated metal homes that sit along the river that comes off the main river.

Urayasu for many years was a hub of clam harvesting, fishing, and seaweed gathering.  Urayasu was a town of fisherman.  They were utterly dependent on the sea to provide for them.  Those fisherman days are all but completely over.  There are a few families that make their living from the sea, but most now travel into Tokyo and have company jobs.

I am a bit saddened as Japan looses these pockets of old culture as the mad dash to modernize and compete on the world stage.  As I biked around the neighborhood, I was astonished to see the amount of rebuilding in the old neighborhood.  Everywhere I looked I saw houses being taken down, empty lots being prepped and building going up.  There was so much construction that was dismantling the tight community of Urayasu.

I came upon a large patch of land that had recently been bulldozed and graded relatively flat.  Buried though out the earth were thousands of shells. A reminder of the properties seaside past, or past profession.  They I spotted something unusual next to a cinderblock wall, I spied a Japanese stone lantern, and assorted rocks making up a small zen, meditative garden.  This little patch of tranquility had been sparred the bulldozer, and hopefully will be preserved for the next house that is to come.  It gives me some hope that all might not be lost in the old neighborhood of Urayasu.

Bulldozed Lot with Japanese Lantern and Rock Garden

Yoshino, No Relation

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

A Yoshino family of fishermen, not far from my home.  No relation to the Yoshino I am married into, but a beautifully worn metal kanji.

Yoshino, No Relation

Abandoned Fisherman’s House in the Middle of the Suburbs

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

I came across this abandoned fisherman’s house today not far from Kasai station.  It is a bit unusual because I had seen it before, but it wan’t till today that I realized that it was a fisherman’s house.  Fishing used to be a way of life in Kasai, but for the most part it has been abandoned, along with this house.

There also was a gorgeous graffiti piece done on the pad locked door.  That is really what caught my lens.  Here was this house of wood, with nets hanging on the wall, and there was this gorgeous painting on the door.

Tokyo, and even my own neighborhood of Kasai never ceases to amaze me.  I have cycled though so many f these streets, and I still manage to see things that I have never seen before.

Get out and explore your own neighborhoods.  Look for the things that you have never seen before.  Find those little gems that speak to your heart.

Fisherman's House Graffiti

Fisherman's Needle, and Coil

Fisherman's Nets

Village Side in Katsuura

Monday, July 12th, 2010

The little town that was adjacent to the beach was full of all my favorite things.  Door that are falling off their hinges, window just waiting to be framed, and all and all buildings showing their age.  The town was small and full of surprises.  I only really got to see just a taste of the town.  I would love to go back and explore some more.

Catch of the Day

Inside and Outside

Flying Fish Wall

Complicated Beach Storage

Can't Come In

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