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Under the Tracks and Beyond in Asakusabashi

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Two Potted Aloe Plants with Bicycle, Asakusabashi

 

I have been a bit confused over what kind of components are needed to be able to plug in my electronics on my trip to South Korea this week for the Jeccheon Film and Music Festival.  Our short film KRS ONE:  Brooklyn to the Bronx was invited and will make it’s international debut there.

Been all over the internet, and finally just decided to revisited Akihabara to make sure I have what I need to keep my cameras clicking in Korea.  After running around checking the web, and talking with some staff I discovered that both my iPhone and my Ricoh battery charger can handle the 220 voltage and all that I needed are plug adapters.

I was deciding where to head next, I often make a right and head towards Ueno, but today I went straight following the the train tracks that lead me to Asakusabashi.  An interesting part of Tokyo filled with bead shops, leather, and shoe makers.  It is a neighborhood I have never explored so in the summer blazing heat I treaded around the neighborhood.

Shops and little eateries filled the arches under the tracks.  I just kept on walking and walking.  Eventually I walked all the way back over to the Tozai line at Monzenakacho station.

A good day to sweat and click.

 
Noren (Curtain), VIne, Terracotta Pot, Asakusabashi

Small Factory Front with Koi Fishtank, Asakusabashi

Found Japanese Booty of the Copper Kind

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Antique Japanese Copper Coin with Embedded Grain of Sand

 

While combing the beach in Okitsu for broken bits of celadon and bits of pottery with blue glazes I came across a rather odd little circular object.  When I first spied it the disk in the sand I thought it was a washer from one of the fishing boats that dock on both ends of the beach.

I reached over and picked it up, to next think that I had found a modern 5 yen coin that someone had dropped in the water and had tarnished.  Part of the disk was missing, and the hole in the middle was square.  I thought that was a bit odd because modern five yen coins have a round hole, and have the look more off brass rather than copper.

I showed it to some of my mates back at are BBQ area and they said I had found a bit of Japanese treasure.  After doing a little digging around on the internet, I can determine that the coin is at least pre-Meiji era (1868).  it is most likely from Edo era (1603-1868).

I have beach combed in Florida for years always dreaming of finding a little piece of pirate booty, only to travel halfway around the world to find a piece of Japanese treasure.

Under the Shimbashi

Sunday, August 29th, 2010

Wedged in between Onarimon station and Shimbashi station lies a lovely plethora of backstreets, cafes, and drinking spots.  Some places it seems like time stands still, or that they have been forgotten by the people at large.  The wood breaks away from it’s frame, and the paint curls under the summer sun.  Soaking up the vibe and the sweat as I wandered back and forth from the two stations.

Image is Nothing or Everything

A Not so Little Teapot

Rusted Flower Shoji

Okinawa Under the Tracks

Filling the Gap

The Boxer of Narashino, by Knock Out

Friday, May 28th, 2010

I was enjoying my stroll on the way to bus stop.  Stopping and clicking with my camera whenever the urge hit me.  A shot of something fallen over in a window display, some golden kanji painted on the door of a barbershop.

I noticed out of the corner of my eye an old man with a bright red shirt, kind of checking me out. I haven’t always had the best of luck with older Japanese men on the street in Japan before, so I was on my guard.

But, this time was different. He wanted to me to take his picture.  He stuck this boxing pose and I snapped it with my ricoh.

He then chatted me up for a minute telling me where are the best spots to shoot Mt.  Fuji.  He also mentioned that there are elaborate paintings of Mt. Fuji at the Sento (Public Bath House).  Which I already knew.

It turned out to be a nice little chat, and he shook my hand when we went our separate ways.

Knocked out!!

Boxer of Narashino City

Takimoto Watch Shop, Political Poster Abstractions

Sunday, April 25th, 2010

Walking thought the little streets of Narashino I came across the Takimoto Watch Shop.  An establishment that looks as if it has been there for eternity.  A thick layer of age covered everything on in and out of the store.  A beautiful testament to the glory design of the Showa Era.

Dancing Venus, Self Reflecting, Takimoto Watch Shop

Takimoto Watch Shop

Show Your Orange Stripes, Only for the Ladies

Wrinkles in Time

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