rock

White Stone in my Girl’s Hands

Saturday, May 11th, 2013

White Stone in My Girl's Hands

 

There she was on a windy Friday afternoon.  She is always in the same spot.  She is there no matter the weather.  Sitting quietly on a small polished podium surrounded by flowers.  She waits patiently at the head of a small creak.

Her skin is youthfully smooth, polished and glistens in the sunshine.  Although she speaks of eternal youth, her skin has a burnished patina.  She is my girl.  She has been ever since I moved into my neighborhood.

It doesn’t matter that she may be made of bronze, I still adore her.  Her hands are outstretched in anticipation of the gifts she will receive from the neighborhood’s children.  Today I spotted her sporting a beautiful crystalized white stone.

I look forward to crossing paths with her soon.

 

Nokogiriyama, The Lost Quarry of Chiba Prefecture

Saturday, August 27th, 2011

My friend Tomo and I have a tradition over the last couple years of selecting a location that neither of us have been to before.  After we find the place to visit we load up our camera gear and head out to the location.  This year we chose to go to Nokogiriyama in Chiba Prefecture.  Nokogiriyama literally means sawed cut mountain in Japanese.  It was an active stone quarry from the Edo times up until Show (20th century).  It has now been taken over by a large temple complex and the walls and carved caves are filled with buddhist sculptures.

One TV show described Nokogiriyama as a place that Indiana Jones would visit.  And this I found to be a bit true.  The jungle side of Chiba Prefecture was quickly engulfing the deep cut walls of the quarry, and there were, at times, mysterious stone steps that lead nowhere.

As my friend and I made our way up the hundreds of steps the sounds of the summer and also the autumn cicadas was deafening.  The air was as thick as miso soup, but we were fortunate because the sun was hiding behind the clouds, and therefore the weather wasn’t that bad.  By the time we reached the top of the mountain the fog was just starting to wash over the the stone face.  It was pretty amazing.  I hadn’t really seen any fog since I had left the San Francisco Bay area ten years ago.  Just standing there watching the fog roll up one side of the mountain and then dissipate over the other.

There is a lookout point called “Peering Into Hell” on the top of the mountain.  Not quite sure why they call it hell, because the view is quite amazing.  It was jungle below, with the vertical quarry walls dropping vertically below our feet.

It was a great day to wander around the sprawling complex.  So removed from the hustle of Tokyo life.  I sometimes forget that there is more to life in Japan that the daily grind.  I am thankful for my friend Tomo for driving us out to Nokogiriyama, and for reminding us both of the beautiful intersection between the manmade and the wild jungle.

The Peering Over Hell Overlook, Nokogiri Yama

Cut Wall with Climbing Vine, Nokogiri Yama

Cut Cliff Face, Nokogiri Yama

Sliced Valley with Stairs, Nokogiri Yama

Back to the Gardens in my Town, Tokyo

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

After a long break from being able to wander the gardens of Tokyo, I am back and happy to indulge my artistic nudges.  I went to a park I have been today called Rikugien Garden.  It was a beautiful park to visit on this summer afternoon.  Large fluffy clouds filled the skies as the cicadas mi mi miiied themselves into an absolute frenzy.

It feels like for most the summer is just about over, however, for me it is just beginning.  I have the freedom to wander and explore places that I have never been, always with camera in hand.  The park was for the most part empty.  I could wander nearly they whole way around the park without seeing another visitor.  Halfway around the pond there was a little chayasan (teashop) where I sat had a cup of macha (thick green tea) and a little sweet in the shape of an umbrella.  I just sat there and my senses just took in the sights and the sounds of the garden.  The little ants that marched single file on the bamboo fencing.  The koi (carp) that came to the surface begging for snacks, and the trace ripples of wind across the surface of the pond.

All in all a gorgeous day to be out in the park.  Soaking up the sunshine, the sounds, and the flavors of urban Tokyo.

Sky Land Pond, Rikugien Garden Tokyo

Bamboo Pond with Leaf, Rikugien Garden Tokyo

Stone Slab Bridge with Turtles, Rikugien Garden Tokyo

Rish Rush Brook, Rikugien Garden Tokyo

Overcast in Katsuura Beach

Sunday, July 11th, 2010

I was fortunate to head out of Tokyo on Sunday and out to the Pacific side of Chiba.  Beaches and little seaside villages line to coast, as sun bathers, surfers, and families head down to the cooling Pacific waters.  Luckily the day was a bit overcast which kept the overall temperatures down.

In typical Japanese fashion the beaches were not that clean, and were rather rocky.  The rockiness always reminds me of Japan’s twin on the other side of the Pacific, California.  Both have been battered by strong waves and the land has been shaped by even stronger earthquakes.

This first group represent the coast.  The point where the land melts into the sea.

More to come from the little seaside towns later.

Rocky Seaside

One Fisherman, Two Fishermen

Purple Rope in a Wavebreaker Landscape

Where Rock Meets the Pacific

I Left My Heart on the Big Island

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

I was impressed as I drove on route 19 on the Big Island in Hawaii.  Driving past the ancient black lava beds I was struck by white graffiti that covered the the black lava on both sides of the highway.  With messages of love or Happy 60th Birthday Grandpa, I had to take a closer look to see how it was done.  The writers gathered white sun bleached coral and used that to contrast the black rocks.

While chilling at the locals beach Isaac Hale Beach Park, I found some white coral and left a little homage to those messages along route 19.

My heart will drift in and out with the waves…

m2c at Issac Hale Beach, Big Island Hawaii

I think this is the reason for the slow uploading of images.

Every time I look at my images, I get homesick for a land that quickly became home.

Copyright 2007© m2c LucidCommunication - Jacob Schere